Estádio José Alvalade

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Estádio José Alvalade on Wikipedia
Estádio José Alvalade
Jose-Alvalade-Stadion in Lissabon.jpgUEFA 4/4 stars
Full nameEstádio José Alvalade
LocationLisbon, Portugal
Coordinates38°45′40.30″N 9°9′38.82″W / 38.7611944°N 9.1607833°W / 38.7611944; -9.1607833
OwnerSporting Clube de Portugal
Capacity50,095
Record attendance50,046 vs Real Madrid[1]
Field size105 x 68 m
SurfaceGrass
Construction
Broke ground2003
Opened6 August 2003[2]
Construction cost€105 million
ArchitectTomás Taveira
Tenants
Sporting Clube de Portugal (2003-present)
UEFA Euro 2004
2005 UEFA Cup Final

Estádio José Alvalade is a football stadium in Lisbon, Portugal, home of Sporting Clube de Portugal, one of the "Big Three" clubs in Portugal. Having replaced the former Estádio José Alvalade (1956), it is the center of a complex called Alvalade XXI (which includes a mall called Alvaláxia with a 12-screen movie theater, a health club, the club's museum, a sports pavilion, a clinic, and an office building), designed by Portuguese architect Tomás Taveira. It was classified by UEFA as a 5-star stadium, enabling it to host finals of major UEFA events. The stadium – originally projected to hold only 40,000 spectators at any given time – has a capacity of 50,095[3] and was acoustically engineered as a venue for major concerts. The stadium has also a total of 1,315 underground parking spaces, including 30 for disabled spectators. Its official opening was on 6 August 2003 when Sporting played and beat Manchester United 3–1. It also hosted the 2005 UEFA Cup Final between Sporting and CSKA Moscow, which CSKA Moscow won 3–1. On the exterior, the stadium features multi-coloured tiles. Seats are also arranged in a random-looking colour mix.

The stadium hosted five matches of UEFA Euro 2004, one of them being the semi-final between Portugal and the Netherlands, which Portugal won 2–1.

The complex, officially known as Alvalade XXI, cost a total of €162 million, with the stadium accounting with almost €121 million and was built adjacent to the site of the previous Estádio José Alvalade.

After years of coping with a poor playing surface, the Sporting board initially decided to install synthetic turf for the 2011-12 season, but this decision was later abandoned for the use of artificial lighting by Stadium Grow Lighting.

This stadium was also featured in a Travel and Living Channel culinary-themed show called World Cafe, guided by Bobby Chinn, when they were travelling in Lisbon. They cooked a traditional Portuguese sweet dish right in the middle of the pitch.

Contents

  • 1 First match
  • 2 UEFA Euro 2004
  • 3 2005 UEFA Cup Final
  • 4 Other Internationals hosted
  • 5 Seating distribution
  • 6 Transport
  • 7 References
  • 8 External links

Seating distribution

  • Disabled Seats – 50
  • Skybox Seats – 1,542
  • VIP and Business Seats – 1,968
  • Tribune Seats – 100
  • Public Seats (Level A) – 24,261
  • Public Seats (Level B) – 21,970
  • Press Seats – 204

Transport

The Stadium is served by the Campo Grande station[4] of the Lisbon Metro and a bus terminal served by several companies. The Segunda Circular, a major ring road of Lisbon, runs close by and the stadium can be reached via the exit Estádio de Alvalade. There are several car parks around the stadium.

It is a relatively short distance (3km) from Lisbon's other major stadium, the Estádio da Luz.

References

  1. ^ http://www.ojogo.pt/futebol/1a-liga/sporting/noticias/interior/sporting-real-recorde-de-assistencia-em-alvalade-5512716.html
  2. ^ http://www.worldofstadiums.com/europe/portugal/estadio-jose-alvalade/
  3. ^ http://www.sporting.pt/Futebol/Estadio/estadio_historia.asp
  4. ^ Campo Grande Station

External links

  • Sporting Club web site

Coordinates: 38°45′40.30″N 9°9′38.82″W / 38.7611944°N 9.1607833°W / 38.7611944; -9.1607833

   

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