Share clip:

Complete Video List

Sort By:

          API Application

          To use the RockPeaks API, you’ll need to tell us a bit about yourself and your application.
          To start please tell us if your application will be for personal, non-commercial use or whether it will be used commercially and generate revenue.

          Share clip:

          Complete Video List

          Sort By:

                  Elvis Presley on the Milton Berle Show June 5th, 1956

                  Published: October 11th, 2011, 11:11 pm

                  Elvis Presley’s second appearance on the Milton Berle show on June 5th, 1956 proved to be a pivotal one, bringing him a level of exposure and attention he hadn’t received before, and clearly demarking the acceptability gap between the old puritanical order and the new youth-driven culture of free expression and greater permissiveness.


                  Elvis opened the show with “Hound Dog”, a number originally written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller and first popularized by black blues singer Big Mama Thornton in 1952. The evolution of the song – from its R&B origins through a series of more “countrified” versions culminating in Elvis’s own unique up-tempo interpretation – in many ways mirrored the commingling of musical forms that would provide the basic blueprint for the emerging rock and roll sound.

                  This is Elvis’s eighth television appearance, and it’s the first one on which he would perform without a guitar. Confident and comfortable, it is impossible not to get caught up in the excitement and enthusiasm that the King exhibits on stage. Elvis biographer Peter Guralnick perceptively noted how during Scotty Moore’s solo the singer hangs back and exhibits the “shrugging, stuttering, existential hopelessness of James Dean” (who indeed was one of Presley’s idols) but it was what Elvis did during those moments when he held centre stage that really define this clip.

                  Twenty seconds in, Elvis stretches out his left arm and lets his hand quiver and vibrate seductively in the air, as though his whole body is charged with the electrical energy of the song. It’s basically all over at this point: Elvis has won, and the gyrating hip thrusts, the plaintive, bent-knee bearing and toe-pop poses are all merely icing on the cake.

                  Bumping and grinding in time to the beat, he eventually slows the tempo down to a bluesy pace and singles out an audience member (no doubt female) for special attention. You can almost hear the nation’s moral guardians sitting bolt upright in their chairs at home, outraged at the indecency of what they were seeing on their screens, while the studio audience, shown in a series of cutaways, scream and swoon at his sexually charged magnetism.

                  This performance would ensure that the sobriquet “the pelvis” would be appended to Elvis’s name in countless newspaper and magazine articles from this point on, while a sampling of some of the more colourful press reactions gives a sense of how prudish and stuck up a good deal of America still was in 1955: “…an exhibition that was suggestive and vulgar, tinged with the kind of animalism that should be confined to dives and bordellos” wrote one, “a strip-tease with clothes on” said another. “[Popular music] has reached its lowest depths in the ‘grunt and groin’ antics of one Elvis Presley” groused the Daily News.

                  Elvis himself remained perplexed at the intensity of the moral outrage, and would later comment “I can’t figure out what I’m doing wrong…I know my mother approves of what I’m doing” (Guralnick, p 322). Nonetheless, the reaction necessitated a toning down of the stage act, as future television appearances were jeopardized by the growing scandal. The next time Elvis performed Hound Dog on TV, he would be conservatively dressed in a long coat and tails, and would sing a slowed down version of the number to an actual basset hound. On Ed Sullivan, he would famously be shot from the waist up.

                  Syndicate content

                  Complete Review List

                  Where It All Began: Bo Diddley Kicks Off the Rock-On-TV Revolution

                  Published: October 11th, 2011, 11:04 pm

                  Who? Bo Diddley, the early 50s progenitor of the rock and roll sound, grew up in Mississippi and influenced generations of white rock stars, though in is early days might have sounded a little too "African" for some people's taste.

                  Syndicate content

                  Complete Review List

                  Paul Westerberg's World Class Fad

                  Published: October 11th, 2011, 06:28 pm

                  In the rock sub-category of old fuckers taking shots at the upstarts building on their legacy, this one’s a corker – right up there with Pete Townsend’s "Rough Boys".  Then, Pete was getting pissy about Punk’s first wave – the one that started out in the mid-70’s with the Stooges and The New York Dolls.

                  By the time of this performance the music media had started calling Paul Westerberg “the elder statesman of Punk”. (He didn’t seem to give a shit.) The Replacements – that inspired band of fuck-ups he had co-founded in the early 80’s– had fizzled out in the summer of ’91, only months before the third wave punk explosion that was the Seattle scene would take off. Millions of kids who couldn’t name a single Ramones song were flocking to the malls to buy albums by Pearl Jam, Mudhoney, Soundgarden and the biggest band of them all, Nirvana.

                  Which brings us to this blistering performance of ‘World Class Fad’ from the Jools Holland show in 1993.

                  Many suspected this caustic rocker was aimed at Nirvana. Westerberg steadfastly denied that the song was about the newly anointed grunge heroes. But in an interview with Q Magazine he hilariously remarked that ‘Smells Like Teen Spirit’ sounded like “Boston with a hair up its ass.” 

                  “World Class Fad” has all the elements of a classic Mats song: smart-ass point of view, pounding no-fancy-stuff drumming, and two crunchy guitars turned up a little too loud. And lyrically it hits a theme found in a lot of Westerberg songs – another wry jab at the juncture of success, whoredom, and self-deception.

                  The new band are pretty happy. Guitarist Dave Minehan gets a bit spastic on the guitar solo. Westerberg is in fine vocal form and seems pleasantly amused by the ruckus all around him. In the end it’s not the pissy point of view that makes this performance essential viewing (Nirvana were obviously a great band). Rather, in the grand tradition of watching Iggy or David Johansen put on a show, it’s simply a lot of fun seeing an old punk show the new kids how it’s done.

                  Syndicate content

                  Complete Review List

                  Stevie Nicks reaches Full Orgasm

                  Published: September 29th, 2011, 12:53 pm

                  If you ever wondered why Stevie Nicks is often ranked as one of the greatest female rock n roll singers, you’re never going to wonder again after you experience this climax.

                  I cannot believe this performance surfaced!  This is the historic "Rosebud" clip that first aired on The Midnight Special.  Not only do I remember that night in ‘75 —  but I still have the cassette tape made from the TV speaker!

                  Syndicate content

                  Complete Review List

                  What happens when Johnny B. Goode makes too much money?

                  Published: September 12th, 2011, 11:23 am

                  Joe Walsh – the Keith Moon of guitar, and one of rock’s genuine full-on crazies – takes his time with his famous autobiographical theme song. Like a great party, this goes on forever. Walsh is well known for changing lyrics, changing tempos, and changing genres – within the same song. Here he mixes reggae, comedic stylings, R&B call-and-response, and classic rock guitar hooks and solos. In fact the whole song is a call-and-response to Chuck Berry’s little country boy named Johnny B. Goode after he grows up and becomes a big rock star. Not only does he play his guitar like ringing a bell, but listen for him playing a ringing doorbell in the “party till 4” verse.
                   

                  Syndicate content

                  Complete Review List

                  Two Hundred and Ten Seconds of Nirvana A Recipe for alt.rock Perfection

                  Published: August 30th, 2011, 03:18 pm

                  If you need a reminder as to why Nirvana were the most exciting and important band of their generation, look no further than this clip, captured in the fall of 1991 at a moment when their breakthrough “Nevermind” was just starting to blow up around the globe, but before the mass adulation and ensuing media attention began to take its toll on the group.


                  From the fuzz echo guitar and throaty, plaintive drawl of Kurt Cobain to the ferocious, single-minded skin pounding of Dave Grohl and the syncopated, low-slung bass playing of a barefoot and bouncing Krist Noveselic, all the elements of the classic Nirvana sound are present, including the alternating quiet/heavy/quiet dynamics and punk rock power riffing wrapped around a conventional pop song structure.

                  The number they’re playing is an old Nirvana favourite, a cover of The Vaseline’s "Jesus Doesn't Want Me for a Sunbeam", which the group would also play on their MTV Unplugged set a few years later. This version is more ragged and energetic, and is complimented by pleasingly raw camera work and minimal editing, which makes the whole affair seem almost offhand in its casualness. Enjoy this moment for what it was, three guys on the verge of superstardom who were still enjoying the spotlight and happy to be playing before an audience of hometown fans.
                   

                  Syndicate content

                  Complete Review List

                  It ain't that complicated

                  Published: August 27th, 2011, 03:17 am

                  It takes a pretty great song to be a hit and reach a lot of people.  But those can so easily be conjured by a thousand slight-of-hands.  There’s a select few that can be broken down to a voice and a guitar and still deliver the magic.

                  Syndicate content

                  Complete Review List

                  Homeboys of Happiness

                  Published: August 26th, 2011, 07:11 pm

                  If somebody told you Sam Cooke and Cassius Clay did a duet — would you believe them?

                  There were a mere nine months between Clay becoming the against-all-odds youngest-ever World Champion and the time St. Sam de Soul was shot to death.  But the get-together happened.

                  The guy who wrote the Civil Rights anthem A Change Is Gonna Come, but died before the mountaintop was reached,

                  Syndicate content

                  Complete Review List

                  Live from the Troubadour

                  Published: August 25th, 2011, 08:08 am

                  Here’s a rock peaks paradox. The Crocodiles, one of the best new bands in America, finally get a live network television debut but it’s a taped clip from a recent gig at the Troubadour in Los Angeles, bundled into Last Call with Carson Daly no less.  That would have been cool had they chosen the single of the summer - “I Wanna Kill.” Instead we get “Neon Jesus” from the previous year. Beggars truly can’t be choosers. What matters is that we get the Crocodiles at all. Jesus and Mary Chain 2009? Stay tuned…

                  Syndicate content

                  Complete Review List

                  Share clip:

                  041 - Squeeze

                  Added: August 9th, 2011, 06:37 am

                   
                  In mid-2010 Squeeze made another of their musical comebacks, releasing an album called "Spot The Difference" and playing a series of high profile gigs. It took a while to make it to the trading community, but when we received a DVD copy of their NYC Bryant Park concert a few weeks back, filmed as part of PBS's Artist Den series, we knew it was time for a retrospective of one of England's best loved and most literate post-punk bands.
                   
                  We set up the Squeeze story with some choice interview clips from the Sky Arts show "Songbook". Chris Difford and Glenn Tilbrook, two musical friends – one providing lyrics, the other melody – swap cassettes by mail, sign to a label and suddenly find themselves heralded as the next Lennon and McCartney. After a disastrous initial recording session with John Cale, their debut album yields only one memorable track – "Take Me I'm Yours" – but they find their way with their 2nd, 3rd, and 4th records which are rightly considered pop rock classics.
                   
                  "Another Nail In My Heart", from the aforementioned Bryant Park concert, finds the group sounding as fresh as ever in July of 2010, while "Slap and Tickle", from the Old Grey Whistle Test in 1979, is one of the earliest video documents of the band at the peak of their new wave prowess. One of the only full length video concert documents from the 80s period is a BBC "In Concert" taping recorded at the Regal Theatre in Hertfordshire; we play a verse from the bouncy and biting Difford-sung number "Cool for Cats".
                   
                  "Tempted", from the masterful "East Side Story" is here represented by a clip from the NBC show "Sunday Night" (later renamed "Night Music"). Jools Holland does double duty as both presenter and performer, and saxophonist David Sanborn, who would later host the show himself, also joins the group on stage. "I Got Everything In the World But You" is representative of the groups 90s output, and we're lucky enough to have a clip of it from the Late Show with David Letterman, taped on November 1st, 1993. Finally, we sample a bit of the group's classic "Pulling Mussels (from the shell)" recorded on July 13th, 2010 for the Late Night with Jimmy Fallon show. Note the novel use of the iPad during the piano solo.

                  Syndicate content

                  Complete Episode List

                  Sort By:
                      Share clip:

                      040 - Amy Winehouse

                      Added: July 31st, 2011, 06:38 pm

                       
                      A look back at the short but brilliant career of Amy Winehouse, the talented North London singer who passed way on July 23rd, 2011 at age 27. We cover her debut album "Frank" with selections from her 2004 appearance at Glastonbury ('Stronger Than Me") and at the Mercury Prize Awards the same year ("Take The Box"), plus part of an interview she gave to Jonathan Ross that same year.
                       
                       Her hugely succesful follow-up record "Back To Black" earned her a record five Grammy awards, and we feature part of her performance of "You Know I'm No Good" from that historic telecast, as well as her touching acceptance speech. Amy performed "Rehab", the album's catchiest single for her North American TV debut on David Letterman, and the record's title track during an appearacnce on the MTV live music show "45th At Night".
                       
                      From her 2007 DVD "Live from London" we sample a bit of "Monkey Man", and part of her band-leading performance of "Free Nelson Mandela" at the ANC leader's 90th birthday party at Hyde Park the following year. We close off with the soaring "Valerie", played at the 2008 Brit Awards alongside "Back to Black" producer Mark Ronson on double-necked guitar. 

                      Syndicate content

                      Complete Episode List

                      Sort By:
                          Share clip:

                          039 - Vaccines

                          Added: July 18th, 2011, 10:41 pm

                          This week we check in with the Vaccines, the London based four-piece who many music scribes see as heralding a renaissance in good old-fashioned British guitar rock. If you’re unfamiliar with their stunning debut album “What Did You Expect From The Vaccines?” stay tuned for the next five minutes while we whisk you through some of the band’s peak performances so far.
                           
                          First up is the sublime “All In White” recorded in at the York Stereo last November, and an excellent introduction to the darkly brooding power of front man Justin Young. Nine days earlier, the Vaccines appeared on Later with Jools Holland to play “If You Wanna”, perhaps the catchiest track on the album, and the one that propelled them to international attention.
                           
                          Little surprise then that they also chose to play it on the David Letterman show this past May, while on a mini tour of the US. We also sample a bit of “Post Break-up Sex” from the Festive Festival, the BBC showcase on Radio 1, home of DJ Zane Lowe who is credited with discovering the band last August while browsing YouTube. Finally, a triumphant moment from Glastonbury in June of 2011 – “Wet Suit”, played to a crowd of adoring, if slightly damp fans.
                           

                          Syndicate content

                          Complete Episode List

                          Sort By:
                              Share clip:

                              038 – Clarence Clemons

                              Added: June 29th, 2011, 12:04 pm

                              An overview of some of the Big Man’s peak video moments, including “Born To Run” from the Hammersmith Odeon in 1975, the tour that broke the Boss in the UK, as well as “Spirit in the Night”, an early piece of footage from Ahmanson Theatre in L.A. in 1973. Both of these are available on the deluxe 30th Anniversary edition of Born To Run.

                              Clemons related the story of how he came to join the E Street Band when he sat down with talk show host Alan Thicke in the early 80s, a period that saw him release a couple of solo albums, including the excellent “Rescue”, which featured the Red Bank Rockers. We play a bit of “Jump Start My Heart”, performed on Swedish TV in 1984.

                              As a member of the E Street Band, Clemons is probably best remembered for his star sax turns in “Rosalita” and “Jungleland”. Included in this episode of the Vlog are snippets from an incendiary 1978 concert at the Agora Ballroom that features the former song, as well as the 25th Anniversary of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, which features the latter.
                               

                              Syndicate content

                              Complete Episode List

                              Sort By:
                                  Share clip:

                                  037 - Young The Giant | Emmylou Harris | Steve Earle | Wolfgang's Vault | Poly Styrene

                                  Added: May 16th, 2011, 08:06 am

                                  Young the Giant’sMy Body”, the first single from their eponymously titled debut album, is one catchy number. We play a snatch of it from their Jools Holland appearance on May 3rd, 2011, as well as some highlights from a rowdy, stage diving filled performance from Slim’s in San Francisco, shot on April 22nd by the good folks at http://intheopen.tv/. Last November, the group were featured on Billboard Magazine’s “Tastemakers” show, where they played “I Got” at the Mophonics recording studio in Manhattan. These guys seem like they’re on the verge of big things.

                                  A new record from Emmylou Harris is always cause for celebration, and the April 26th, 2011 release of “Hard Bargain” is no exception. The twenty-sixth record from the country music legend is a beautiful, if bittersweet affair, touching on absent friends as well as personal and historical recollections. “Darlin’ Kate” is a sorrowful lament for her friend Kate McGarrigle, beautifully captured by NPR’s cameras during SXSW in March, while Six White Cadillacs is a groovy, upbeat country blues number that clearly impressed the audience on the David Letterman Show. We also play a little of “This is Us” from her underrated collaboration with Mark Knopfler in 2006, as well as “Boulder to Birmingham”, the song that first distinguished her as a lyricist back in the 70s.

                                  At this point in his career, Steve Earle isn’t content with just making music – his latest album “I’ll Never Get Out Of This World Alive” comes with a full-length novel, and the Virginian country rocker has made a bit of a name for himself as a character actor on shows like the Wire and Treme. We’ve got clips from those two shows: his portrait of recovering drug-addict “Waylon” on the former, and as the street musician “Harley” on the latter, as well as a bit of “Every Part of Me” performed on Letterman on April 29th, 2011, and the chilling “CCKMP” from the Texas Connection way back in 1991.

                                  Wolfgang’s Vault has long been home to some of the finest live concert audio recordings of the past 40 plus years, and a couple of weeks back the site finally brought online a large part of its massive video collection as well. The sudden availability of hundreds of hours of free streaming concert video from the Bill Graham archive is fantastic news for music fans everywhere, and we’ve only had time to digest a tiny part of it, including Van Morrison’sCyprus Avenue”, and the Allman Brothers’Whipping Post” (both recorded at the Fillmore East in September 1970). As mentioned in the show, you should really check out Lester Bangs' excellent musings on Astral Weeks. The first full-length show that really caught our eye was the Who’s final performance on their Tommy tour, recorded on the Tanglewood stage in July of 1970, and only seen in bits and pieces until now.

                                  We’re sad to report that the leader of X-Ray Spex, punk icon Poly Styrene passed away on April 25th, 2011. She remains best known for her fiery debut single “Oh Bondage! Up Yours!” and we play a bit of that legendary number, recorded by filmmaker Wolfgang Büld as part of his documentary “Punk In London”, recorded in 1977.
                                   

                                  Syndicate content

                                  Complete Episode List

                                  Sort By:
                                      Share clip:

                                      036 - TV on the Radio | R.E.M. | Elbow | The Kills | Stealers Wheel

                                      Added: April 29th, 2011, 10:17 pm

                                      TV On The Radio bassist Gerard Smith passed away on April 20th – our condolences to his family and friends. The band have called off a series of tour dates in support of “Nine Types of Light”, which they previewed parts of last month at SXSW, including the catchy aggro-rap number “Repetition”. For their Letterman appearance, they featured a couple of dancers on the moody, sensuous “Will Do”, a welcome but far different vibe then the one they unleashed on the Ed Sullivan stage in 2006, when they debuted the adrenaline fueled rocker “Wolf Like Me”. We hope the band manage to reconstitute themselves soon and carry on – their sound on “Nine Types” has developed and matured to the point where they’re one of the most creativly adventurous indie rock outfits out there.

                                      With the release of the excellent “Collapse Into NowR.E.M. have definitively put to rest any notion of a mid-career slump. Over at REMHQ, video documents from the Athens rockers’ summer 2010 sessions at Berlin’s Hansa studios have slowly been dribbling out, starting with “Discoverer”, the album’s propulsive first cut, and more recently with “Alligator Aviator Autopilot Antimatter” (a track that on record features contributions from Peaches and Lenny Kaye) and also the humourously-titled “Mine Smell Like Honey”. It’s great to see Stipe, Mills, Buck and Berry having so much fun playing the new material…watching them rip through Accelerate’s “Living Well” in Paris in 2008 makes us hope the boys might relent and decide to play a few dates in support of this great new record.

                                      Writing in the April issue of Uncut, John Lewis nicely captures the enviable position that UK pop stars Elbow now find themselves in: “A well-deserved Mercury prize triumph in 2008 has elevated them into rock’s premier league, and turned Guy Garvey – keen birdwatcher, unrepentant Yes fan and the band’s affable front man – into something of a national treasure.” We play a bit of “One Day Like This”, recorded shortly after their Mercury win, and then dip into a couple of tracks from ‘Build A Rocket Boys!” their fifth release which is out this month. If “Open Arms” doesn’t quite reach the same heights has the best moments on “The Seldom Seen Kid”, at least tracks like “Neat Little Rows” point toward new musical territories to be conquered.

                                      Pouring through the webcast of this year’s Coachella festival, we were struck by the performance of the Kills, who took to the stage after sundown in the southern California desert and mesmerized the crowd with a stripped down take of “No Wow”, taken from their 2005 album of the same name. A quick journey through the group’s live video catalog finds them popping up on Conan in April of 2008 with “Sour Cherry” and then on French TV later that year truly “Getting Down” with the crowd. We also play a bit of “Hang You From The Heavens” from Alison Mosshart’s stint as a member of the Dead Weather, and also Donna Summer’sLove To Love You Baby" (you’ll have to watch the episode to grasp the connection between the disco diva and the dirty blues.)

                                      The seemingly bottomless archives at the BBC disgorged another treasure this week with the broadcast of Stealers Wheel’s appearance on Top of the Pops in 1973 to perform “Stuck In The Middle With You”, which was shown as part of a “Big Hits” retrospective of the network’s flagship music program. Though it is lip-synced, like 99 percent of TOTP performances, the band do a credible job of miming along, and its great to see the late Gerry Rafferty in his Scots-folkie prime – gotta love the paint job on “Gerald”, his hollow-bodied acoustic.

                                       

                                      Syndicate content

                                      Complete Episode List

                                      Sort By:
                                          Share clip:

                                          035 - Robbie Robertson | Paul Simon | Amy MacDonald | Foo Fighters | Patti Smith Group

                                          Added: April 18th, 2011, 12:39 pm

                                          After more than a decade without a release, Robbie Robertson has stepped back into the spotlight with “How To Become Clairvoyant”, a bluesy, introspective look back at his five decade-long journey in the rock and roll biz, which began in the bars of Toronto’s Yonge Street in the early 60s. We play a bit of Robbie at the 2011 Junos introducing an excerpt of Bruce MacDonald’s documentary on that famous Canadian musical thoroughfare, and then jump into his Letterman appearance shortly afterwards, where he debuted “He Don't Live Here No More” from the new record. Next stop was the Jools Holland show for an interview, and a slower number from the disc, "The Right Mistake", and just in case you’re curious about who those backing musicians are, they’re the members of Dawes, an LA outfit who turned a lot of heads with their first hit single “When My Time Comes” which they performed on TV for the first time in mid-2010 on Craig Ferguson.

                                          The buzz surrounding Paul Simon’s excellent twelfth album “So Beautiful or So What” is deservedly starting to build, and tickets for his upcoming tour are sure to disappear quickly. Simon chose the Jimmy Fallon show to share with us some of the tunes from the new record, and over two nights he played a total of six songs, including the wonderful “Love Is Eternal Sacred Light” and “The Afterlife”, as well as rousing version of “Cecilia”, which saw the members of Stomp providing the percussive bed, and host Jimmy Fallon – playing it straight for once – joining in on guitar. 
                                           
                                          Amy MacDonald is building a steady following of adoring fans, and considering the Scottish singer is only twenty-three, she seems poised for a rewarding musical career, particularly in continental Europe, where she’s experienced her greatest chart success. We play selections from two of her songs, “Spark” from 2010’s “A Curious Thing”, as well as “Mr. Rock and Roll” from 2008’s “This Is The Life”, both recorded by Swiss television.

                                          It’s pretty evident which era of his early career Dave Grohl was hoping to evoke with “Wasting Light”, the seventh studio release from the Foo Fighters. Between recording the thing in his garage on analog gear, and roping in both Butch Vig and Krist Novoselic to contribute on the production and playing respectively, this album fairly oozes Nirvana-era grunge goodness. Tuning in to Saturday Night Live on April 9th we found the Foos in excellent form, shredding their way through two of the discs strongest cuts, “Rope” and “Walk”. Something tells us this album is going to be a big one.

                                          By 1979, Patti Smith’s greatest commercial success was behind her. “Easter”, her third studio album containing the radio-friendly hits “Because The Night” and “Dancing Barefoot” had come out the year before, and she would spend much of the 80s in semi-retirement. But before that decade hit, she toured Europe one last time with Lenny Kaye and the other members of the Patti Smith Group, and on April 21st, played the Grugahalle in Essen, Germany, where the camera team from Rockpalast were on hand to document the event. Last week, German television rebroadcast the concert for the first time in decades, and we close off episode 35 with high quality snippet of a barn-burning rocker from “Easter”, the contentiously tilted “Rock n Roll nigger”.
                                           

                                          Syndicate content

                                          Complete Episode List

                                          Sort By:
                                              Share clip:

                                              034 - Funeral Party | Stephen Colbert | Elton John | 2011 Juno Awards | Duran Duran

                                              Added: April 6th, 2011, 03:05 pm

                                              While it isn’t a perfect rock song by any means, Funeral Party’sFinale” was easily the best new thing we watched last week, and the members of this Californian outfit are no doubt pleased with their noisy network television debut on the David Letterman show. Singer Chad Elliot’s passionate, arresting vocals are just one reason to keep tabs on this band.

                                              At this point, adding anything more to the Rebecca Black – “Friday” media juggernaut seems beyond redundant, as the raven-haired teeny bopper is so far beyond overexposed as to be in completely uncharted territory. Nonetheless, when funnyman Stephen Colbert showed up on Jimmy Fallon last Friday to perform his take on the world’s most annoying pop song, we tuned in, betting the results would put a smile on our face. And indeed they did, as Colbert and Co. pulled off the improbable: making a terrible song highly enjoyable. Watch the full clip here.

                                              We’re gonna guess that Elton John watched Paul McCartney hosting Saturday Night Live last fall and decided to try and outdo his fellow OBE recipient in terms of hogging screen time. In short, Elton was everywhere on the April 2nd episode. The funniest moment to our rock-attuned ears was a skit in which he pogoed around Buckingham Palace singing a punk number with the Her Royal Highness the Queen on drums and Prince Philip on guitar. For his “real” performance though, Sir Elton once again teamed up with Leon Russell, and together they performed “Monkey Suit” from their 2010 album “The Union”.

                                              The 2010 Juno Awards were chock-a-block full of great musical moments – check out our Juno Show page, which has a list of all the currently available streams on it. For our money, it was the Robbie Robertson introduced segment that celebrated four Canadian greats – Joni Mitchell, Neil Young, Gordon Lightfoot and The Band – that proved to be the evening’s highlight, drawing together the timeless music of those greats with outstanding performances from relative youngsters like Sarah Harmer, City and Colour, and The Sadies among others.

                                              OK, we’re officially calling for a ban on bigwig Hollywood directors being handed concert webcast gigs. For starters, just because you can direct actors in a feature film production over multiple weeks doesn’t mean that you’ll be any good at capturing a bunch of unruly rockers from the madness of a mosh pit. The latest case-in-point is David Lynch’s CGI-smeared effort to make Duran Duran look good on the YouTube Unstage. After suffering through a little bit of the not-bad new single “Girl Panic!” we simply gave up on this show, retreating 30 years to watch the group’s debut on Top Of the Pops, where they performed their first single “Planet Earth”.
                                               

                                              Syndicate content

                                              Complete Episode List

                                              Sort By:
                                                  Enter your Rock Peaks username.
                                                  Enter the password that accompanies your username.
                                                  Forgot Password?
                                                   

                                                  Not a Member Yet?

                                                  Join

                                                  It's Free!